Monthly Archives: April 2015

58 Responses to French dining tips (Travel Tips Series)

  1. Though I will never be able to travel to France, I love reading your blog and learning about the culture! Thank you so much for sharing!

  2. Thank you, this is appreciated-very much. There are so many places I would like to try. I need to just jump in and “do it”! Your description of the various steps will give me courage

  3. Love your tips…and your photos! We will be traveling to York, London and Paris mid-September so your tips for Paris are invaluable! We bought a couple of french language CD’s but not sure if taking a class is better….perhaps both! I will have 5 days in Paris so I’ve got to make good use of my time and we will be photographing as much as we can! Thanks so much for your lovely blog! Dj

  4. So much enjoy all of your posts and tips…I long to be back en la belle France…soon, I hope…merci tellement…

  5. Merci! Two questions: 1)does one wait to be seated at a café (whether inside or outside), or is the customer expected to find his/her own seat? 2)Is there such a thing as “un déca crème,” or “déca au lait”?

  6. Bonjour !
    Je vous suis déjà sur Facebook avec ma page “La Bourgogne de Nathalie”, aujourd’hui je suis ravie de m’abonner à votre blog ! Les photos sont belles et il donne envie. Je ne suis pas sûre d’avoir toujours le temps de le lire, mais c’est pas grave. C’est amusant de voir décrit des détails auxquels on ne fait plus attention mais tellement vrai !
    Très bon week end !
    Nathalie

    • Merci de votre visite, Nathalie. Je reconnais votre nom pour l’avoir vu sur ma page Facebook. En ce qui concerne le blog, vous n’aurez aucun mal à le suivre, car je n’ai plus trop le temps d’écrire depuis que j’ai changé de travail il y a deux mois. La page Facebook, en revanche, est mise à jour quotidiennement. A bientôt.

  7. What valuable tips we found here! My daughter Kathleen and I enjoyed our meals near Beauvais, where our meals included lively conversation and informal French lessons. We have much left to learn so we feel we must return!

  8. If is so refreshing to hear someone speak of French waiters and not end the sentence in swearwords. I spent part of my youth in Orleans and have returned to France many times. I am so tired of people telling me the French hate Americans. Too many Americans do not appreciate that eating should be an experience to be savored ( no pun intended). Many wait persons in this country will hover over your table, interrupt your meal to see if you are satisfied, refill your water and generally make pests of themselves to prove their efficiency. When I tell them a good French waiter will come to your table when you indicate a desire for further service, not before. One of my most pleasant experiences with my wife was a spring afternoon and wine with a cheese side on the Rue De Rennes that lasted two hours. Great people watching. We are looking forward to an upcoming visit to Bordeaux l’ete prochain.

    • Merci beaucoup James. I recently posted a couple of articles about French and American waiters on my Facebook page, and it was obvious most people felt very strongly about the differences in service. I do enjoy my French waiters, indifferent or attentive, and even the occasionally surly one (but that’s probably because I miss France, and Europe ;-))

  9. My ‘boyfriend’ and I are traveling to Paris, Montpelier, Perpignan and Barcelona in September. He sent me a link to this blog post and I am delighted to have your advice to ‘study’ before our visit. It is a first trip to France for both of us.

  10. Love your practical information.
    After an ill afted trip with an American pal who
    was let’s say not receptive to French culture, I may travel alone next time.
    I really love the culture and the cuisine!
    My french is not to great,but I can improve with practice.
    I want to know how to make friends in while France?
    Sometimes I do see when waiter or shop worker finds out Im American
    the attitude is somewhat mean(not all the time ofcourse)
    Any tips??
    Merci

    • As a young man I lived in Orleans. I’ve returned to France on numerous occasions over the years. I don’t know how many times I’ve heard “the French hate us. French waiters are mean” I’ve found this not to be true. Yes, we’ve had our differences with the French government. Thats the government, not the people in general. I think the perception that waiters are mean is a mis-understanding. The French enjoy eating. They appreciate good food. There is an understanding in France that dining is a pleasure, it is an activity to be thoroughly enjoyed. The idea that you rush in and consume a meal in less than twenty minutes is a catastrophe. The typical waiter fully understands that dining is an experience. They do not constantly interupt your dining experience by refilling your water, emptying your ashtray, taking away empty plates or asking how your are enjoying the meal, or if you want anything else. They will wait and watch. When you indicate you want service, they will come. They are not mean, they are leaving you alone.

  11. Great blog!
    We’re excited, but feel helpless when communication is an issue.
    My tongue is all twisted now from practicing my very limited french.
    It would be a perfect trip if only we can take you!
    😉

    • Well, merci beaucoup. I would love to tag along and be your interpreter 🙂 You will be fine if you learn a few greetings and basic expressions. Many people in Paris and on the French Riviera speak English quite decently. What matters is to make them *feel* like speaking English to you. A friendly attitude and a respectful greeting usually do the trick.

  12. What a wonderful & thoughtful idea! Thank you. I hope to receive, by email now, all additional blogs from you. My goal is to head to France next year(2017) for an extended stay. What time of year do you find the weather to be most suitable for travelers use to desert climates? I am thinking perhaps April, May, June?

    • The weather can be unpredictable, like everywhere else in the world right now. June is the busiest month in Paris so plan ahead if you are staying in a hotel. Spring and fall tend to be popular, because there can be fewer crowds then; and the weather is more pleasant than in the summer or winter. Still, I have been hot in Paris in June; and other years, I had to wear my trench coat and run between raindrops. I truly believe there is no bad time to see Paris. For a first visit, I’d go for spring or fall. Happy planning!

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